THIS MONTH’S PROFESSIONALS

Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D.

Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D.

Clinical Psychology

Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D. Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D. is a clinical psychologist, family therapist and the author of the book, The Emotional Survival Guide for Caregivers—Looking After Yourself and Your Family While Helping an Aging Parent (Guilford, 2006). As a clinician, he specializes in helping families cope with serious and chronic medical illnesses. As an educator, he works as the Director of Behavioral Sciences for the Crozer-Keystone Family Medicine Residency Program in Springfield, PA and has had adjunct faculty positions with the Temple University School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and the Department of Psychology of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Dr. Latonya Law

Dr. Latonya Law

Family Nurse Practitioner

Dr. Latonya Law is a Family Nurse Practitioner, board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Credentialing Center (AANCC) and licensed by the state of Georgia. She is devoted to the advancement of medicine and contributes by holding memberships to the American Nurses Association, Black Nurses Rock, and Georgia Nurses Association.

Dr. Michelle Grimes

Dr. Michelle Grimes

Dr. Michelle Grimes is a doctoral prepared board certified Family Nurse Practitioner. Michelle has been a nurse for over 30+ years. She graduated from Chamberlain University in 2017 with a terminal degree in Advanced Practice Leadership and the University of Missouri St. Louis with her Family Nurse Practitioner degree in 2014. Michelle is CEO/President of the St. Louis Chapter of Black Nurses Rock where she leads her chapter in healthcare events and awareness throughout the local community, she is an American Heart Association Ambassador and a member of their support network of responders where she answers questions via emails that patients or families may have, and most recently she became a member of the Association of Missouri Nurse Practitioner Advocacy Committee. Michelle is also an active member of ANA, AANP, BNA, MONA, NBNA, ANNP.

Joseph P. Hanna M.D.

Joseph P. Hanna M.D.

Neurology

Joseph P. Hanna M.D. Dr. Joseph Hanna, M.D., MBA, serves as Chairman of Neurology at The MetroHealth System, Inc. Dr. Hanna serves as an Associate Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Dr. Hanna joined The MetroHealth System in 1996. His clinical expertise ranges from treatment of headache and epilepsy to neuro-restorative therapy and stroke/neuro-intensive care. Dr. Hanna founded MetroHealth’s annual Teen Brain Health competition to encourage high school student teams to learn more about important health issues that impact the brain. He has a fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Hanna is board-certified by the American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology in neurology and in vascular neurology. Dr. Hanna has a Medical Degree from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and completed his residency at University Hospitals of Cleveland.

Choose a condition

This Month’s Questions & Answers

  • Cwag528
    Cwag528, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My spouse is having issues with “Pumphead” syndrome. He had mitral valve replacement 9/17. Anyone out there have any advice for us?"

    A.

    Pumphead syndrome also known as Postperfusion syndrome is usually seen after the patient has been hooked up to a heart-lung machine for open heart and also valve replacement. Each individual symptom varies but they could include patchy recall, social difficulties and possibly personality changes. The main symptoms of Pumphead is decreased mental capacity in which the condition and symptoms varies for each person which is hard to determine. Studies have shown a high incidence of neurocognitive deficit soon after surgery, but the deficit are often not a permanent impairment Thankyou for this question.

  • dianalavona
    dianalavona, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I need help finding the proper care or rehab for my adult son who is on Alaska Medicaid and Medicare. His stroke encompassed the entire right hemisphere, right eye blindness and left eye left field cut along with left side weakness of his left leg and paralysis of the left arm. His stroke happened 8/24/14 he is now 35. He steals and sells my property to buy pot and alcohol. He's not drinking and smoking everyday as far as I know but his behavior is that of a addict. I've found places that would be perfect, I think, but none of them take Medicaid/Medicare. What am I supposed to do? He's going to end up homeless if I can not find the proper help for him and support for me. Please, are there solutions that I'm not aware of?"

    A.

    Substance abuse and the anti-social behaviors that go along with it are a scourge for many American families nowadays. But it sounds like there are three issues here for your family:
    --The one that you present is that of insurance coverage for drug rehab services. I strongly recommend that you call your state’s Medicaid office directly to learn of exactly what treatment services your son might be able to receive and where. I doubt that Alaska has no facilities or intensive outpatient programs that accept “dual eligible” insurance—Medicare and Medicaid.
    --That said, it will make no difference what resources you find unless your son is truly interested in changing his behaviors. I’ve talked with many parents who, with all best intentions, tried to rescue their children by strong-arming them into drug rehabs, then found that their children quickly dropped out of those services. The prevailing philosophy of substance abuse rehab in general is that addicts must decide to change for themselves and not at the behest of their parents or anyone else in their lives.
    --But a third issue here is whether your son’s drug use is his primary problem or whether he is using pot and alcohol because he’s bored, depressed and/or anxious. People with significant disabilities of all types have high rates of substance use because of their lack of gainful employment and low self-esteem. Before you even try to find a substance abuse program for him, I would have him evaluated by his primary care physician who can sort out which of your son’s problems should be treated first.—Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D., AHA volunteer and co-author of AARP Meditations for Caregivers

  • zeigler56
    zeigler56, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My husband suffered a lower left lobe brain bleed 5182018, he is improving, however, the Aphasia and confusion are acute. Will his communication and understanding ability improve?"

    A.

    Improvement will continue for several years after the stroke. His recovery will be hastened and ultimately better if encouraged to participate in his speech and language therapy. Thank you, Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • 79051
    79051, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I wanna know why doctors be so careless sometimes?"

    A.

    In the 24 years that I spent as a psychologist working in a primary care office to teach family physicians about behavioral health issues, I found the hundreds of physicians with whom I interacted to be mostly caring, largely competent, and frequently frustrated. The healthcare system in which they have to work—seeing patients in 15-minute intervals that often felt rushed to them—caused them to cut corners by shortening conversations and postponing explorations of certain patients’ complaints until the next medical appointment. I don’t know if that’s what you mean by “careless” or if you are referring to the mistakes they sometimes make. In those rushed sessions, medical mistakes are made—mostly small ones, such as forgetting to write out prescriptions or fill out forms. But in rare instances, larger mistakes occur with the potential to do harm. Of course we need a better, more flexible system in which physicians have the time they need to practice with greater care. Until that day, however, it is essential that patients and the family members who accompany them to medical appointments remain on guard for physicians’ mistakes. I suggest asking questions if you have doubts about the treatment plans, double-checking prescriptions before you leave the office, and calling back afterwards if you still have concerns. Decreasing carelessness is a goal we can all help achieve.—Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D., AHA volunteer and co-author of AARP Meditations for Caregivers

  • Stefan
    Stefan, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "after hemoric stroke and 9 days coma what are chances."

    A.

    I’m very sorry you or your loved one is suffering from what appears to be a devastating stroke. The prognosis after this type of brain injury can be difficult to predict. I would recommend that you continue to work with your physicians and care team to understand what their impression is about how you or your loved one is doing and what the future may hold. Thank you Dr. Sunil Sheth

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