THIS MONTH’S PROFESSIONALS

Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D.

Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D.

Clinical Psychology

Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D. Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D. is a clinical psychologist, family therapist and the author of the book, The Emotional Survival Guide for Caregivers—Looking After Yourself and Your Family While Helping an Aging Parent (Guilford, 2006). As a clinician, he specializes in helping families cope with serious and chronic medical illnesses. As an educator, he works as the Director of Behavioral Sciences for the Crozer-Keystone Family Medicine Residency Program in Springfield, PA and has had adjunct faculty positions with the Temple University School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and the Department of Psychology of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Dr. Latonya Law

Dr. Latonya Law

Family Nurse Practitioner

Dr. Latonya Law is a Family Nurse Practitioner, board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Credentialing Center (AANCC) and licensed by the state of Georgia. She is devoted to the advancement of medicine and contributes by holding memberships to the American Nurses Association, Black Nurses Rock, and Georgia Nurses Association.

Kimaka Bowens, MSN, APRN, FNP-C

Kimaka Bowens, MSN, APRN, FNP-C

Kimaka Bowens, MSN, APRN, FNP-C is an experienced Nurse Practitioner with a demonstrated history of working in the Healthcare Industry. She specializes in Family Health, Women’s Health, and Urgent Care. Kimaka Bowens is a strong Healthcare service professional with a Masters Degree focus Family Nurse Practitioner. Masters Degree obtained from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Dr. Michelle Grimes

Dr. Michelle Grimes

Dr. Michelle Grimes is a doctoral prepared board certified Family Nurse Practitioner. Michelle has been a nurse for over 30+ years. She graduated from Chamberlain University in 2017 with a terminal degree in Advanced Practice Leadership and the University of Missouri St. Louis with her Family Nurse Practitioner degree in 2014. Michelle is CEO/President of the St. Louis Chapter of Black Nurses Rock where she leads her chapter in healthcare events and awareness throughout the local community, she is an American Heart Association Ambassador and a member of their support network of responders where she answers questions via emails that patients or families may have, and most recently she became a member of the Association of Missouri Nurse Practitioner Advocacy Committee. Michelle is also an active member of ANA, AANP, BNA, MONA, NBNA, ANNP.

Dr. Sunil Sheth

Dr. Sunil Sheth

Vascular Neurologist

Dr. Sunil Sheth Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology McGovern Medical School at UTHealth Dr. Sunil Sheth is a board-certified vascular neurologist specializing in endovascular treatments for cerebral and spinal vascular diseases. Dr. Sheth is an assistant professor of neurology at UTHealth’s McGovern Medical School. Dr. Sheth has co-authored many articles, which have been published in Cell, Nature Biotechnology, PlosONE and the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery. He has been awarded grants from the American Heart Association, Society for NeuroInterventional Surgery Foundation and National Institutes of Health. He has also received numerous honors and awards and lectured across the country on the management of ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular disease.

Joseph P. Hanna M.D.

Joseph P. Hanna M.D.

Neurology

Joseph P. Hanna M.D. Dr. Joseph Hanna, M.D., MBA, serves as Chairman of Neurology at The MetroHealth System, Inc. Dr. Hanna serves as an Associate Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Dr. Hanna joined The MetroHealth System in 1996. His clinical expertise ranges from treatment of headache and epilepsy to neuro-restorative therapy and stroke/neuro-intensive care. Dr. Hanna founded MetroHealth’s annual Teen Brain Health competition to encourage high school student teams to learn more about important health issues that impact the brain. He has a fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Hanna is board-certified by the American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology in neurology and in vascular neurology. Dr. Hanna has a Medical Degree from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and completed his residency at University Hospitals of Cleveland.

Richard T. Benson Md., PhD.

Richard T. Benson Md., PhD.

Neurology

Richard T. Benson Md., PhD. Richard T. Benson, MD, PhD. is the associate medical director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at MedStar Washington Hospital Center. Dr. Benson received a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Fisk University in Nashville. After working one year as a biochemist at Case Western Reserve Medical School, he attended Meharry Medical College in Nashville, where he earned his medical degree and a PhD in neurophysiology. Dr. Benson's doctoral thesis focused on "Excessive Methylation in Parkinsonism." While studying at Meharry Medical College, Dr. Benson received numerous research honors, and was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Dr. Benson completed his neurology residency training at the Harvard-Longwood Neurology Program in Boston. He then completed a two-year stroke fellowship with the Neurological Institute at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York, while completing a master's degree in epidemiology. Dr. Benson has worked previously at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospitals, Alexandria-Fairfax Neurology, PC, Inova Alexandria Hospital, Inova Fairfax Hospital, and the Office of Minority Health and Research at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. His areas of special interest include health disparities, minority health, issues related to stroke and/or cerebrovascular disease, and translational research related to various neurological diseases.

Choose a condition

This Month’s Questions & Answers

  • OtterAnnie
    OtterAnnie, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My husband had a stroke 4 yr ago that affected use of his left arm and leg. He can't use his arm and can walk short distances with a leg brace and cane. He his terrible "tone" (spasticity) in his left side and leg that comes and goes. He describes it as burning and tightness. Everyone we've talked to (PT, primary, neurologist) says there's nothing that can be done for that. Is that true? It keeps him in bed and wheelchair for up to a week when its bad. Affects his ability to sleep and makes him miserable. Is there anything to help this???"

    A.

    Your husband’s stroke recovery seems to have been incomplete leaving him with both tone alteration and sensory disturbance on his left side. The tone problem can be addressed through therapy, pharmacology and surgery. The optimization of motor recovery should be individualized using all three modalities to allow him to perform daily tasks. The “burning” and tightness may be part of a post-stroke pain syndrome. This can be managed through therapy and pharmacologic approaches. Sometimes a refresher course guided by a stroke rehabilitation specialist helps improve the quality of life even years removed from the initial stroke. Thank you, Dr. Hanna

  • IvetteRam
    IvetteRam, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "How common is it to see stroke patients go backwards in their recovery process instead of getting better?"

    A.

    The grand thing about stroke survival is that nearly all get better in some degree as time passes. A period of deterioration within the first several days surrounding a stroke can be from extension of the incident stroke. Clots extend into additional vessels stealing blood from viable brain. Hemorrhage into the brain extends disturbing the surrounding environment even further. Later deterioration may be from a variety of medical conditions including infection, poor oxygenation and perfusion, additional brain swelling, blockage of the ventricular drainage system in the brain and depression to name a few. Thankfully, each of these causes for neurologic decline has a treatment and your clinicians have been trained to be watchful and to intervene early and optimize recovery. Thank you, Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • Meister
    Meister, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I had an ablation 3 weeks ago today went for for a check up ekg it Says I am still in a-fib. Was told that sometimes it takes 3 months for healing. While in recovery after the ablation,I had to have a bag Of magnesium,it was low out of range. I feel that this may be involved with my situation. The Dr.s do not tell you anything.I really do not think that my cardiologist knows.I have not had my mag. checked in till then.I experience severe cramps in my rib cage,and have always felt that it was my electrolytes."

    A.

    Your concerns are valid but it is recommended that you speak with your cardiologist about your concerns and symptoms you’re experiencing. Each recovery period could vary but for further treatment, your information will be available with the provider that could make the changes. Thank you, Dr. Laytona Law

  • zahiralam
    zahiralam, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "Last week I had a minor heart attack. As a result I had angioplasty done to my main artery. Since then I experience shortness of breath often. Is it normal and should I expect to recover soon?"

    A.

    The recovery period varies but during the healing process, you could possibly experience shortness of breath after a heart attack. It is important to consult with your doctor for possible other testing if symptoms persist and to give updates. Thank you, Dr. Latonya Law

  • Irith
    Irith, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I just had an angioplasty procedure and would like to know what the recommended cholesterol levels should be now. Total cholesterol level LDL recommended level, HDL recommended level and the Triglycerides level. I can't find this information anywhere. thank You Jerry Stevenson, age 76"

    A.

    It is definitely recommended that you speak with your doctor regarding developing a strategy to help reduce your symptoms and risks.
    • LDL 190 or more is considered very high, the lower your cholesterol number, the lower your risk.
    • HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) –a higher number means lower risk because it protects you against heart disease.
    • Triglycerides- less than 150 is normal, A high triglyceride level has been linked to a higher risk of coronary artery disease.
    Thank you for this question. Dr. Latonya Law

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