THIS MONTH’S PROFESSIONALS

Dr. Latonya Law

Dr. Latonya Law

Family Nurse Practitioner

Dr. Latonya Law is a Family Nurse Practitioner, board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Credentialing Center (AANCC) and licensed by the state of Georgia. She is devoted to the advancement of medicine and contributes by holding memberships to the American Nurses Association, Black Nurses Rock, and Georgia Nurses Association.

Choose a condition

This Month’s Questions & Answers

  • Pink12
    Pink12, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I had a mini stroke on January 9th 2018 i got nerve pain on my left leg more and less on my right leg but it was affected on the right side and they said it not from the stroke and l am doing alot of test why this is happening, Can you explain this and I am abit confused about it. Roula"

    A.

    It's great that you have been able to lose weight and control your hypertension. Kudo’s to you. Obstructive sleep apnea is relative but carries a general risk ratio of two compared to those without it. Your recent weight loss likely reduced the severity of your nocturnal apnea. The addition of equipment to reduce your apnea at night will further reduce your risk of stroke and make your sleep more restorative. Keep up the excellent work of risk factor modification, follow your physician’s directives and your stroke risk will remain minimal. Thank you, Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • Nuttyrn
    Nuttyrn, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "How much recovery can be expected from a posterior cerebral stroke. Will the double vision resolve over time? Balance is greatly affected on the right resulting in scissoring with a step. Stroke was Nov. 25 with very little improvement in inpatient rehab. Complete exhaustion is huge issue and also had to have a pacemaker inserted Dec.17 and also needs a CEA. Thanks for any input"

    A.

    Your stroke sounds complex as many posterior circulation strokes often are. An individual’s recovery is often difficult to gauge. However, you are still early in your recovery phase. Most double vision resolves. Balance improves and even sometimes returns to normal. Fatigue can be a problem, but will improve in time with exercise, sleep hygiene, and attention to a nutritious diet. If your sleepiness remains a problem, medications exist that increase alertness. Please work with your caregiver to see if such a medication would be appropriate for you. Finally, always be hopeful as attitude is key to stroke recovery . Thank you Dr. Hanna

  • ashishjain37
    ashishjain37, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My left body became paralytic due to stroke 2 years ago. I have regained my functions except extension of fingers and grasping by left hand. I am having daily physiotherapy. How long it takes to get extension of fingers. I can flex them but can't extend. Pls. give your answer/opinion or recommend me how can I use my fingers"

    A.

    Unfortunately, complete motor recovery occurs within two years after a stroke. The arm recovers usually from the shoulder to the hand with the muscles causing flexion becoming stronger than those that cause extension. Thankfully, researchers have been working for the last thirty years on a variety of means to augment human motion with machines. Automated gloves and implantable electrode arrays are just two of the many artificial ways to augment motion. Please contact your local stroke center and see if they have any trials being offered for motor recovery augmentation. If no one in your area has this expertise, you should search the National Institute of Neurologic Disease and Stroke website for information on where applicable trials are being performed. Good luck.

  • Kitthann40
    Kitthann40, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "Can you explain why fatigue is such a problem with stroke. I am having a horrible time with it. People and unwilling to understand and are very nasty about it. I have been called lazy among other things. I need help to deal with it and to prove it is real."

    A.

    Approximately two-thirds of stroke survivors experience fatigue. Fatigue can take the form of either physical or mental exhaustion. It most likely starts within the first several weeks after a stroke, but occasionally can onset months later. The cause of fatigue is unclear. Factors such as disrupted sleep, pain and depression may play a role.
    You should not need to prove its authenticity as more stroke survivors suffer similarly than don’t. Researchers have found that modifications to lifestyle can help alleviate fatigue after stroke. Routine exercise approved by your caregiver helps. Diet rich in fresh nutritious ingredients replenishes strength. Good sleep habits with adequate rest and adjustment to waking for early morning sunshine also alleviates symptoms. Lastly, if these things are not enough, medications can be added to heathen alertness. Feel free to talk to your caregiver to assist you in recovering your stamina. Thank you, Dr. Hanna

  • JAG18
    JAG18, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "Had a brain stem stroke almost 4 months ago, recovered except for occasional balance issues. will they ever totally go away/"

    A.

    The interesting thing about balance is that is relative. The brain’s pathways serving to keep our balance include sensation, vision, gravitational information from our vestibular network along with sophisticated adaptive motor responses that are both conscious and reflexive. The brain adapts to new input from damaged pathways by comparing it with intact pathways and eventually remodeling the network to an optimal solution. A year or more is often needed to make a full recovery. A therapy plan with daily exercise speeds recovery. Hopefully, your optimal solution will be swift and complete. Thank you. Dr. Joseph Hanna

Previous Questions

dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active