THIS MONTH’S PROFESSIONALS

Dr. Latonya Law

Dr. Latonya Law

Family Nurse Practitioner

Dr. Latonya Law is a Family Nurse Practitioner, board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Credentialing Center (AANCC) and licensed by the state of Georgia. She is devoted to the advancement of medicine and contributes by holding memberships to the American Nurses Association, Black Nurses Rock, and Georgia Nurses Association.

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This Month’s Questions & Answers

  • WinterSimms
    WinterSimms, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My husband had a stroke four years ago. Lately he has become verbally abusive, refuses to see his counselor, and refuses any type of PT. He is had a right side stroke and very severe one. He is totally paralyzed on his left side, has left side neglect and recently I have noticed some cognitive difficulties. This has taken a severe on my physical health. He is 62 and I am 56. Eight years ago I had a neck fusion. And just found out that some of the screws and hinges have failed and I require further surgery. After hearing this he has become more abusive verbally. And for some reason has become extremely dependent on me helping him move around. Things that he’s done in the past, he chooses not to do anymore. How can you help me? How can you help me get him back on the right path."

    A.

    You are describing a relatively sudden change in your husband’s behavior and his cognitive abilities. There are two possible (though not mutually exclusive) reasons: He has had additional small strokes that have gone undetected but have caused further damage and changes. Or he has developed Major Depressive Disorder. In either event, he needs a medical evaluation to figure out the cause. There may be some underlying condition which is remediable. Your husband may yet be restored to a more agreeable and less verbally abusive man. –Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D., AHA volunteer and co-author of AARP Meditations for Caregivers

  • SelinaBarnes
    SelinaBarnes, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My dad called me on Feburary 2, 2019 it started off a normal call so I thought. Just then he wasn't acting normal. I listened closely and found out my dad had a stroke. He kept telling me something happened last night. I rushed over to his house see he was in a stroke. Rushed him to the hospital. Was doing okay. Talking, walking. Then bam nothing. Sadly I lost my dad a week later. Massive stroke and I wish I could have saved him. If only i would of called him that night."

    A.

    I’m so sorry for your loss. It sounds like you cared about your dad a lot. I understand your wish to have saved him. We all second-guess ourselves and ask “What if…” after the death of a loved one. What if—by luck or fate—you had called your dad the night before? There’s no telling that that would have prevented his death from a major stroke. I hope that you can avoid feeling guilty. This was not in your hands to control. As the Serenity Prayer so neatly states it, “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change.”—Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D., AHA volunteer and co-author of AARP Meditations for Caregivers

  • brindallrn
    brindallrn, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "About 3 months ago my 16 year old daughter found me on the floor in the living room in the middle of the night. She said I was slurring my words not making sense. She said when I tried to stand up I couldn't. Some how she managed to get me to the ER. All they did was xray my ankle, which was broken, and send me home telling her everything else would just clear up. I continued to have the initial symptoms and also right sided weakness, balance problems and falling, and my daughter said my affect was flat. I have no memory of the first two days. Symptoms lasted about 5 days. MRI and EEG were negative. I had an episode a few weeks earlier of confusion that lasted about 15 minutes. I have no risk factors for stroke. I am curious as to what this may be."

    A.

    A local physician with access to your records is best suited to answer your inquiry. However, four things cause abrupt neurologic change – stroke, seizures, metabolic derangements, and migraine. The first and likely last two are excluded by your evaluation if as reported is accurate. Only, seizure remains to be explored. Please consult a local physician to aid in your health. Thank you, Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • dave1952
    dave1952, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I had a stroke 6 months ago. I am discovering relearning how to walk smoothly with a stride in my gait is very difficult. Does anyone have any suggestions to help me? Thank you Dave"

    A.

    Your walking may be optimized best by enlisting three groups in your recovery – a physician to alter medications especially regarding leg stiffness, physical therapy to give you pointers on walking and provide the correct bracing and accessories such as a can or walker, and most importantly yourself to practice diligently. Thank you, Dr. Hanna

  • nanacheryl
    nanacheryl, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My 41 yr old son in law had a stroke. Where can we get help with caregivers at low cost or volunteers to help watch him and the 2 kids?"

    A.

    Each community is different and requires local knowledge to best manage. The primary care physician is best suited to refer you to local caregivers equipped to assist your son. Volunteers in the community may better be obtained after enlisting a homecare service group. Their connections to the community are likely strong as they commonly deal with similar situations. Lastly, I refer you to local stroke support groups who again have dealt with similar circumstances. Thank you. Dr. Hanna

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