THIS MONTH’S PROFESSIONALS

Dr. Latonya Law

Dr. Latonya Law

Family Nurse Practitioner

Dr. Latonya Law is a Family Nurse Practitioner, board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Credentialing Center (AANCC) and licensed by the state of Georgia. She is devoted to the advancement of medicine and contributes by holding memberships to the American Nurses Association, Black Nurses Rock, and Georgia Nurses Association.

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This Month’s Questions & Answers

  • ken11sun
    ken11sun, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I believe I had a minor stroke, it has affected my esophagus. I now have trouble swallowing (water) and I have slurred speech. The doctor has scheduled me for a ct scan. What other treatment should I be looking for?"

    A.

    Speech and swallowing specialists usually test the swallowing function with a modified barium swallow. This consists of swallowing a variety of thicknesses of barium laden substances while being viewed radiographically. Once the cause of the swallowing difficulties is ascertained, a therapeutic plan can be devised to speed recovery including medications and exercises. Thank you, Dr. Jospeh Hanna

  • bydesign
    bydesign, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "What is BP supposed to be? one doctor says 135 is good and I dont want it too low, Other says over 130 not good and need to see primary doc for more BP pills. I wish one doctor would look into the root of why high BP. MY BP changes all day. from 127 to 147 and average is 135."

    A.

    Optimal blood pressure levels have recently been revised. The higher number, systole, should be less than 130mm HG. However, for an individual, the exact best number is seldom known. Blood pressure, similar to any fluid pressure in pipes, wears out the pipes earlier. So, the lower the pressure you have as long as you perfuse the brain adequately, the better off you may be. Thank you for this question. Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • smoine001
    smoine001, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "Greetings, How best to prevent another stroke. How best to re-cover eyesight, use of arm. Thanks, Sophie"

    A.

    You can present another stroke by seeing your local stroke specialist or primary physician and inquiring into why you had your stroke. First, address the reasons for your first stroke and then attend to additional reasons for having another stroke. This secondary stroke prevention is best accomplished through stroke risk identification and modification. Afterward, begin medications known to minimize stroke such as an antithrombotic medication and cholesterol-lowering statin. Thank you, Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • sadness
    sadness, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I'm hoping that someone could give me some good advice, mainly financially, following a stroke last summer. I still have a lot of recovery left to do, but I've made a lot of progress as well. My big problem is that I couldn't access money in the hospital and afterward, partly because I had no memory of computer passwords at all, which caused bank problems after 3 months. Which in turn is likely to have me losing a whole year of income from the state, which will likely make me homeless. The crazy thing is that I have that money from the state--I just can't get at it to it give it to them. I hope this this makes some sense."

    A.

    I am sorry that you are having such a difficult time. I suggest making an appointment with state officials and back personnel in your community so that they might assist you in accessing your accounts and keeping a roof over your head. Thank you, Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • WinterSimms
    WinterSimms, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My husband had a stroke four years ago. Lately he has become verbally abusive, refuses to see his counselor, and refuses any type of PT. He is had a right side stroke and very severe one. He is totally paralyzed on his left side, has left side neglect and recently I have noticed some cognitive difficulties. This has taken a severe on my physical health. He is 62 and I am 56. Eight years ago I had a neck fusion. And just found out that some of the screws and hinges have failed and I require further surgery. After hearing this he has become more abusive verbally. And for some reason has become extremely dependent on me helping him move around. Things that he’s done in the past, he chooses not to do anymore. How can you help me? How can you help me get him back on the right path."

    A.

    You are describing a relatively sudden change in your husband’s behavior and his cognitive abilities. There are two possible (though not mutually exclusive) reasons: He has had additional small strokes that have gone undetected but have caused further damage and changes. Or he has developed Major Depressive Disorder. In either event, he needs a medical evaluation to figure out the cause. There may be some underlying condition which is remediable. Your husband may yet be restored to a more agreeable and less verbally abusive man. –Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D., AHA volunteer and co-author of AARP Meditations for Caregivers

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