THIS MONTH’S PROFESSIONALS

Dr. Latonya Law

Dr. Latonya Law

Family Nurse Practitioner

Dr. Latonya Law is a Family Nurse Practitioner, board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Credentialing Center (AANCC) and licensed by the state of Georgia. She is devoted to the advancement of medicine and contributes by holding memberships to the American Nurses Association, Black Nurses Rock, and Georgia Nurses Association.

Kimaka Bowens, MSN, APRN, FNP-C

Kimaka Bowens, MSN, APRN, FNP-C

Kimaka Bowens, MSN, APRN, FNP-C is an experienced Nurse Practitioner with a demonstrated history of working in the Healthcare Industry. She specializes in Family Health, Women’s Health, and Urgent Care. Kimaka Bowens is a strong Healthcare service professional with a Masters Degree focus Family Nurse Practitioner. Masters Degree obtained from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Dr. Michelle Grimes

Dr. Michelle Grimes

Dr. Michelle Grimes is a doctoral prepared board certified Family Nurse Practitioner. Michelle has been a nurse for over 30+ years. She graduated from Chamberlain University in 2017 with a terminal degree in Advanced Practice Leadership and the University of Missouri St. Louis with her Family Nurse Practitioner degree in 2014. Michelle is CEO/President of the St. Louis Chapter of Black Nurses Rock where she leads her chapter in healthcare events and awareness throughout the local community, she is an American Heart Association Ambassador and a member of their support network of responders where she answers questions via emails that patients or families may have, and most recently she became a member of the Association of Missouri Nurse Practitioner Advocacy Committee. Michelle is also an active member of ANA, AANP, BNA, MONA, NBNA, ANNP.

Dr. Sunil Sheth

Dr. Sunil Sheth

Vascular Neurologist

Dr. Sunil Sheth Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology McGovern Medical School at UTHealth Dr. Sunil Sheth is a board-certified vascular neurologist specializing in endovascular treatments for cerebral and spinal vascular diseases. Dr. Sheth is an assistant professor of neurology at UTHealth’s McGovern Medical School. Dr. Sheth has co-authored many articles, which have been published in Cell, Nature Biotechnology, PlosONE and the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery. He has been awarded grants from the American Heart Association, Society for NeuroInterventional Surgery Foundation and National Institutes of Health. He has also received numerous honors and awards and lectured across the country on the management of ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular disease.

Joseph P. Hanna M.D.

Joseph P. Hanna M.D.

Neurology

Joseph P. Hanna M.D. Dr. Joseph Hanna, M.D., MBA, serves as Chairman of Neurology at The MetroHealth System, Inc. Dr. Hanna serves as an Associate Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Dr. Hanna joined The MetroHealth System in 1996. His clinical expertise ranges from treatment of headache and epilepsy to neuro-restorative therapy and stroke/neuro-intensive care. Dr. Hanna founded MetroHealth’s annual Teen Brain Health competition to encourage high school student teams to learn more about important health issues that impact the brain. He has a fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Hanna is board-certified by the American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology in neurology and in vascular neurology. Dr. Hanna has a Medical Degree from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and completed his residency at University Hospitals of Cleveland.

Richard T. Benson Md., PhD.

Richard T. Benson Md., PhD.

Neurology

Richard T. Benson Md., PhD. Richard T. Benson, MD, PhD. is the associate medical director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at MedStar Washington Hospital Center. Dr. Benson received a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Fisk University in Nashville. After working one year as a biochemist at Case Western Reserve Medical School, he attended Meharry Medical College in Nashville, where he earned his medical degree and a PhD in neurophysiology. Dr. Benson's doctoral thesis focused on "Excessive Methylation in Parkinsonism." While studying at Meharry Medical College, Dr. Benson received numerous research honors, and was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Dr. Benson completed his neurology residency training at the Harvard-Longwood Neurology Program in Boston. He then completed a two-year stroke fellowship with the Neurological Institute at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York, while completing a master's degree in epidemiology. Dr. Benson has worked previously at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospitals, Alexandria-Fairfax Neurology, PC, Inova Alexandria Hospital, Inova Fairfax Hospital, and the Office of Minority Health and Research at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. His areas of special interest include health disparities, minority health, issues related to stroke and/or cerebrovascular disease, and translational research related to various neurological diseases.

Choose a condition

This Month’s Questions & Answers

  • JAG18
    JAG18, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "Had a brain stem stroke almost 4 months ago, recovered except for occasional balance issues. will they ever totally go away/"

    A.

    The interesting thing about balance is that is relative. The brain’s pathways serving to keep our balance include sensation, vision, gravitational information from our vestibular network along with sophisticated adaptive motor responses that are both conscious and reflexive. The brain adapts to new input from damaged pathways by comparing it with intact pathways and eventually remodeling the network to an optimal solution. A year or more is often needed to make a full recovery. A therapy plan with daily exercise speeds recovery. Hopefully, your optimal solution will be swift and complete. Thank you. Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • Cdotis
    Cdotis, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My 52 year old son had 5 way by pass surgery in May. Last week he had a stroke and almost died. After they removed the blood clot he appears to have made a full recovery. He has not been put on blood thinners. Something about they haven't seen him go into Afib. I do not understand, I am afraid of him having stroke. Are the doctors wrong?"

    A.

    Your emotional support for your son is commendable. Atrial fibrillation is always a concern when an individual sustains an embolic stroke of an uncertain source. You should be encouraged that the doctors caring for your son are investigating all possibilities for your son’s stroke. An implantable monitor is sometimes used to search for intermittent cardiac arrhythmias. However, until a source of embolus that has been demonstrated to be minimized best with anticoagulants without untoward risk is detected, your son may be safer with medications such as aspirin along with optimal cerebrovascular risk minimization. Thank you, Dr. Joseph Hanna

  • Susieq1220
    Susieq1220, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "How do you deal with the post stroke depression. It's very difficult for me."

    A.

    Post-stroke depression is very common among stroke survivors, especially those who suffered a left-brain stroke affecting the right-sides of their bodies. I recommend that you ask your primary care provider to evaluate you for clinical depression. Medications and psychotherapy can be very helpful to improve your mood and better adjust to your post-stroke life.—Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D., AHA volunteer, co-author of AARP Meditations for Caregivers

  • jakelane
    jakelane, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "had stroke almost two years ago is it too late to have the surgery to remove the clot"

    A.

    Your body removes the blood clot from most arteries within days through chemistry present within your bloodstream. Clots occurring outside of the vessels and within the brain are scavenged by microglia and removed nearly entirely. The remaining blood within the brain is isolated by an astrocytic scar. After two years, your clot is gone and the surgeon’s work is done. Thank you, Dr. Hanna

  • Almartin17
    Almartin17, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My dad suffered a severe hemmoragic stroke on the right side of his brain that is bleeding on the occipital, parital, and temporal lobes. We have been given little hope. What measures can be taken with this type of stroke?"

    A.

    Large blood clots within the brain lead to significant disability. Early blood pressure control and correction of bleeding tendencies can limit the size of the hemorrhage. Thankfully, some of the problems arising from the hemorrhages can be minimized. Protection of the airway reduces the risk for pneumonia. Prevention of complications of immobility such as deep vein clots in the legs, skin erosion from pressure, and respiratory limitations is best accomplished with experienced nursing care. Finally, early rehabilitation with specialists trained in regaining disability after stroke will optimize eventual recovery. Thank you, Dr. Hanna

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