THIS MONTH’S PROFESSIONALS

Dr. Latonya Law

Dr. Latonya Law

Family Nurse Practitioner

Dr. Latonya Law is a Family Nurse Practitioner, board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Credentialing Center (AANCC) and licensed by the state of Georgia. She is devoted to the advancement of medicine and contributes by holding memberships to the American Nurses Association, Black Nurses Rock, and Georgia Nurses Association.

Tessa Messinger

Tessa Messinger

Critical Care and Remote Clinical Practice

Tessa Messinger Tessa Messinger is an experienced RN whose body of work has includes coordination of patient enrollment and follow up in cardiovascular and Alzheimer’s trials. She has worked extensively with multidisciplinary team for management of TAVR and Mitra-Clip patients. Messinger currently works for the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) as a Remote Clinical Practice Specialist, Nurse Peer Reviewer.

Choose a condition

This Month’s Questions & Answers

  • kathy11
    kathy11, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "I had an MI 6 weeks ago with 2 stents. I am 54 years old. Havee DM and high Cholesterol. Initially, I felt great now have terrible and anxiety and insomnia. Take Xanax and Cymbalta. Is this normal to feel so anxious and depressed post MI"

    A.

    Unfortunately, it is not unusual. About 15-20% of people who’ve had an MI or heart surgery will suffer from depression and/or anxiety afterwards. The good news is that we have effective treatments for both. Medications, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, can help with the physical symptoms of depression/anxiety, including insomnia and low energy. Psychotherapy can help with the fears of dying and post-traumatic stress symptoms that often occur following an MI. Please talk with your primary care providers about evaluating you for both types of treatments. I feel sure that you will be feeling better soon.—Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D., AHA volunteer, co-author of AARP Meditations for Caregivers

  • donna1929
    donna1929, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "They found a hole in my heart after I had a stroke. They want to repair it by going through my groin. Is this dangerous?"

    A.

    ASD is Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) which is also known as a hole between the chambers of your heart. The treatment for this defect and after multiple testing is inserting a fine tube into a vein in your groin. This catheter is then passed to your heart. Inside the catheter there is a tiny balloon that the team will use to measure the exact size of the hole so that they can choose the best device to close. With all procedures, there are risks and each risk will depend on the person and their medical history. You would definitely want to follow up with your provider regarding any concerns and discuss risks factors that could be narrowed down to you and your medical history. Thank you, Dr. Latonya Law

  • Keepingfaith
    Keepingfaith, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "Hello, I would like to seek help on my mothers condition. In 2011 she had a quadruple bypass surgery. Surgery was successful. Despite serious blockages, she able to recover soon and get back to daily lifestyle. Fast forward to 2017, she was complaining on chest tightness and uneasiness. After multiple trips to cardiologist, they finally agreed to perform an angiogram. Angiogram revealed 2 bypasses (from 2011 surgery) that we’re not working anymore. They placed 2 stents in one of the bypasses and since the other bypass was about 40-50% they didn’t do anything to that one. They also didn’t want to spend too much time invasively. Now more than a year later, she has been complaining for months about her nose being blocked making it hard for her to breathe. We have made visits to ENT doctors, lung specialists, cardiologists. They have found nothing wrong with her nose. Pulmonologist says she has a bit of asthma, so now she using an inhaler for about a month or so. Her nose is still constantly and severely blocked, neck and shoulder ache from the constant congestion. She has trouble breathing because of the blocked nose. Nasal sprays, teas etc nothing work. Would appreciate any advice! I hate to see her in pain like this :("

    A.

    Hello, it is recommended that you follow up with your concerns with your providers and specialists for your mother. The best treatment would be given when your providers have the medical records, labs, diagnostic testing readily available especially since there are multiple concerns from Cardiac to ENT.
    Thank you, Dr. Latonya Law

  • Heart15
    Heart15, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My heart condition has introduced a PTSD type experience in my life. I’m constantly worried, anxiety and panic to do certain activities or be to far away from a hospital. What can I do?"

    A.

    Anxiety and panic are not uncommon symptoms for people who’ve had life-threatening experiences such as a heart attack. To live better, those symptoms need to be diagnosed, treated and managed in an ongoing way, just like your cardiac condition. If you haven’t done so already, then please see your primary care provider to be evaluated for an anxiety disorder. If you receive a diagnosis of Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, then you will likely be prescribed medication to lower your degree of reactivity to memories and anxiety-producing stimuli and will be given a referral to a psychotherapist to teach you relaxation and cognitive therapy skills. Most people who undergo treatment for anxiety get real relief. You can, too. Thank you, Dr. Barry Jacobs

  • Tomq930
    Tomq930, SUPPORT NETWORK Member Asks
    Q.

    "My heart attack has set my acid reflux off the charts. The worst part is the symptoms mirror a heart attack so its constantly in my head. Is this normal? How do you deal with it. My herd medication is not doing the trick"

    A.

    Heartburn, angina and heart attack may feel very much alive in which it can be difficult to tell the difference from your medical history and physical exam. Since everyone’s symptoms are different it is recommended that you speak with your provider in regards if this is normal for you. If you have persistent chest pain and you aren’t sure if its heartburn you should seek medical help as soon as possible and speak to your provider about your medication. Thank you, Dr. Latonya Law

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