Isabella
  • 3 replies
  • 566 views
  • 0 followings
Isabella, January 17,  2018  5:03am EST

Convergent Hybrid Ablation Procedure

I am a 66-year old female who has been diagnosed with paroxysmal AFIB (4 major episodes in the past 2 years) that took me to ER.  My cardiologist referred me to a Electrophysiologist Cardiologist and this EP is recommending the convergent-hybrid Ablation procedure.  He says that with paroxysmal AFIB I am a good candidate for this procedure and that there is a 90% chance that it will be successful in fixing my AFIB.  The goal is to eventually get me off of my Diltiazem and Sotalol and xarelto.  This procedure is a two-step process.  First step will be a minimally invasive procedure where a cardiothoracic surgeon will do an incision in the area of the sternum and ablate the outside of the heart.  I will stay in the hospital for 3 to 4 days.  6 weeks later, the EP will go through the groin and ablate the inside of the heart, with a overnight hospital stay.  I would like to hear from anyone who has had this procedure.  Was it successful?  Pros and cons, experiences, etc?t


3 Replies
  • Mellanie at StopAfib.org
    Mellanie at StopAfib.org, January 18,  2018  3:56am EST
    Isabella,I am not aware of anyone currently on the forum who has had the Convergent Procedure. And, once people are afib-free from surgical procedures, they often move on with their lives and no longer hang around afib forums. Mellanie
  • Mellanie at StopAfib.org
    Mellanie at StopAfib.org, January 20,  2018  5:45am EST
    There are several things to consider that make the results from the study that was referenced different from Isabella's situation (it's like comparing apples and oranges):Isabella has paroxysmal afib of short duration and minimal burden (4 episodes over 2 years) whereas those in this study all had persistent or longstanding persistent afib, which means being in continuous afib for up to a year (persistent means less than one year), and many much longer (longstanding persistent means longer than a year). This study indicates that AVERAGE AF duration is 7.6 years. That means the buildup of a lot of structural remodeling and electrical remodeling in the atria, whereas with Isabella having had just 4 episodes, there should be little to no remodeling to deal with. Many of these patients had large (even huge) atria and/or failed ablations (these patients were chosen specifically because they had large atria, failed ablations, or long duration of AF), so comparing this to Isabella's case is totally unreasonable!  This study indicates that prior small US and European studies had shown 80% success at three years. Those studies are older, and the technology and techniques have advanced since those studies. Finally, failure of catheter or surgical ablation has been standardized at 30 seconds of afib after the 3-month blanking period, which is not considered a reasonable yardstick any more. (The CABANA study is expected to yield a more reasonable yardstick for future use.)  If a person had 31 seconds of AF in 3 years, they were considered a failure, whereas most of us would consider just having 31 seconds of AF over 3 years to be a success.Thus, let's trust that Isabella's doctor knows what he is talking about and that due to her situation, she is likely to have a 90% success rate. I would never compare her situation to this particular study (especially since this center was new to the procedure and likely has the impact of the learning curve as well). Centers with a lot of convergent procedures under their belts have high success rates.Mellanie
dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active
Back to top