1Psalmreader
  • 8 replies
  • 1326 views
  • 5 followings
1Psalmreader, February 10,  2020  10:34am EST

New to site

Hello,

I am a survivor from 2011. I am a type 2 diabetic and have just had my first stent last month.

So this will be Cardiac Rehab 2.0 for me. I will look forward to sharing.

8 Replies
  • 1Psalmreader
    1Psalmreader, February 10,  2020  10:35am EST

    Thank You.

  • AHAASAKatie
    AHAASAKatie, February 12,  2020  7:14am EST

    Good morning, I can share the information we have on Cardiac Rehab with you. I can imagine that this is a stressful time and I am sorry you are having the deal with this. Best Katie

  • vancet
    vancet, February 12,  2020  6:01pm EST

    Welcome to the community, 1Psalmreader.  Please do share your recovery.  It will inspire and encourage others who are going through the same thing.  I just finished my cardiac rehab (10 weeks), hopefully that's the only one I'll have to do.  Sorry to hear you have to go through it again.  When I "graduated" the staff told me they hope to never see me again and to stay alive as long as possible.  Please take good care and to not do too much too soon which is a very common thing to do.  

  • yarn007
    yarn007, February 17,  2020  2:31am EST

    Welcome to the site.   Like you I am a type 2 Diabetic.   I had my HA and received a stent in LAD on 3/16.   Cardiac Rehab was a godsend after the HA.   I would recommend it to anyone having heart issues.   I will say the first year of the heart attack was really rough and it took a lot of mental work to overcome the trauma of the event.   Now almost 4 years out I can say that time truly does heal.    

    Currently, my bigger battle is the progression of Diabetes.   Adding more medication and looking at maybe immediate acting insulin.   Bummer!

     

  • steveSD
    steveSD, February 24,  2020  5:37pm EST

    Cardiac rehab really helped me get started on the road to recovery though I think I drove the techs and doctors crazy. I was 47 when I started rehab and ready to push as hard as they'd let me so they were constantly telling me to slow down and let my heart rate catch up. I just wanted to see what I was capable of without doing any harm. When I finished rehab after 6 weeks (because that's all the insurance would allow) they said they had just entered the highest level of output ever for me during my workout so I "won" rehab. Now I'm even stronger and in better shape than I was then. It took a couple of years but I'm fully back to normal and even better because I'm more healthy than I was before the heart attack.

    I also have/had type 2 diabetes. It's well under control now without medication or at least it was until my hip replacement last year. I think the numbers should be back in line on my next tests though. Diet and exercise have made all of the difference in my life. I also try to get more sleep.  I hope everyone has a great week! - Steve

  • yarn007
    yarn007, February 27,  2020  12:24am EST

    How did the hip replacement last year effect your Diabetes?   Just curious.   I have a hip that is going, but it isn't bad enough for a replacement yet.

  • steveSD
    steveSD, February 28,  2020  1:12am EST

    Yarn, 

    Last March I had steroid injections in both hips (inherited osteoarthritis, lucky me)  but I wasn't warned about the potential side effects and my blood sugar went through the roof for over a week. Well over 300 every day. I had a hard time sleeping and I felt really hot. My A1C went from 5.2 to 5.8 so not terrible but I had an issue with my eye that was related. It was frustrating. Fortunately the bump wasn't long lasting but the relief wasn't either. After surgery I had trouble getting my sugars under control for a bit and I wasn't able to work out regularly so my A1C jumped again from back around 5.3 to 6.0. It's been 6 months and I'm finally working out normally again. My leg is getting stronger and it's still a little stiff sometimes but I'm doing so much better. I will eventually need the left one replaced as well but for now it's feeling pretty good. I take turmeric and vitamin c daily (ortho recommended it) and my workouts are strengthening that hip too. My doctor said that the trauma of surgery can affect blood sugars but that it should be getting back to normal again. If I can keep my A1C in the normal range for 2 years it will come off my chart as a current condition so fingers crossed. I would guess everyone's experiences are different. I am pretty happy about my recovery now but it's been a lot of hard work to get here and I still have more to do. I'm alergic to metformin and I was on glipizide the first 2 years but diet and exercise allowed me to get off of it. All of my lifestyle changes allowed me to come off most of my meds and I'm healthier than I have been in years.

  • yarn007
    yarn007, February 28,  2020  3:56pm EST

    Oh, Steve.. the same thing happened to me when I had my first shot and no one warned me about they could do that.   When I had a higher than normal A1C and the Diabetic provider asked me what had changed I told her about the shot and she said: "Didn't they warn you what they would do to your blood sugars".   I said "no".   The Diabetes Provider said to up my insulin the week of the shot to help with greater control when I have a shot done.   That is what I have done ever since.

    What amazes me is the simple things that health care providers do not tell their Diabetic patients.   Before getting steroid shots and what not we should be signing something as patients saying that what procedure or shot we are getting as the potential to radically raise our blood sugars.    

    Thanks for your story and the inspiration I got from it.   My A1C this week was 7.2.   My goals are just to get it in the 6. whatever and keep it there.   Taking all the various Diabetic medications is really rough.   Particularly the Victozia and other ones in that class of injectables.   Those medications make me sicker (GI issues, and what not) and miserable on a daily basis.    

    Thanks for sharing your story Steve.   That was what I like about this website is patients sharing their experiences and helping others.

dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active
dark overlay when lightbox active